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TOPIC: The N Word

The N Word 18 May 2015 02:01 #7167

  • alaina.m
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A lot of people tend to either really enjoy BuzzFeed videos or despise them. The reason I like watching them is because they can be very entertaining and very informative at times. They just recently posted a video asking black people how it felt and their experiences being called the N-word. These types of videos are intended to let the audience view things from different perspectives; which I find to be very endearing.

This video is asking multiple black people about their first experience being called he N-word. Most of them said they were in their teens or young adults. Others said by the time they were just a kid is when they first heard that term directed towards them. I found it shocking how the reason why they got called that was completely random and unnecessary. For example, one woman said she was in the passenger seat of a car when and white man got angry for them waiting for the red light. It's shocking how unprovoked these instances were.

The reason why I chose this video to talk about is because racism still exists today. the N-word is a very derogative term and is meant to insult. The people in this video did in fact feel insulted because of something they can't change. They felt as though they are not equal and not important. This video shows and provides us with examples that racism still does exist. Whether people want to admit it or not; it is still there.

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The N Word 09 Sep 2015 13:30 #7525

  • Lauren.W
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Its really hard for us to tell others not to use the N word or to be offended by it now. Because we use the N word in music and movies and so on.. We black people use the word in our music and in every day life situation. I saw on social media all the time how we use the word so likely and like it was nothing. So others people start using . Many times it our friends and so on.. However many time on social media and youtube I saw people use the word because they are trying to be mean and hurt someone. So yes racism still exist in this country but we cant get mad at people using the word when we using the word ourselves. So in order for us to stop people from using in a bad way, we have to stop using the word period. Because if we make music for people to sing to too and we using the N word. That's mean they will use the word also. How can we be mad at them if they using a word we say ourselves.
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The N Word 10 Sep 2015 02:29 #7528

  • kevin.h
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Lauren.W wrote:
So in order for us to stop people from using in a bad way, we have to stop using the word period.

I disagree. By making the “N word” banned, it makes the word more attractive because it will be viewed as a powerful word because it has special treatment. I think the ideal solution would to make the word lose its meaning so that way, racists would no longer have an easy word to use in order to offend others.

Words can lose their meaning over time due to over-saturation. One example can be the word “gay” which originally was used to describe joy and then changed meaning to “immoral” and then changed its meaning to “homosexuality”. However, when one identifies as gay in modern times, no one assumes that one is identifying oneself as joyous or immoral. This is because the old meanings have lost significance. I believe the same can happen if the “N word” is over saturated which is already being the case due to its transformation of a term of endearment or as a way to reference a person.

However, despite this transformation of the word, I would not be surprised to see a new slang word to replace the derogatory meaning. As long as hatred exists in this world, people will continue to be innovative in ways to offend others regards of words in their vocabulary.
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The N Word 27 Sep 2015 00:18 #7769

  • stephen.f
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In taking your initial discussion post further, while I totally agree with your post about the N word, I want to also discuss something that recently happened to me at work. For the readers to understand, I am a KOREAN male who works in a corporate office. When I was having a casual conversation with my supervisor and another supervisor in another department, the other supervisor said something along the lines of "I will miss your CHINESE smile" (she is being transferred to another office). While her statement was a compliment, and by all means not meant to be offensive, I was offended as she referred to me as CHINESE. While I have nothing against the Chinese, I was offended as being Korean is very different than being Chinese, but because I am Asian, I am automatically Chinese, to those who do not know. In fact, I was actually MORE offended as this particular supervisor was of Hispanic decent; how would she would have felt if I had referred to her ethnicity as being Mexican simply because she is Hispanic? Lets be clear, if you do not know someone's particular ethnicity refer to their general orientation, ie. ASIAN, HISPANIC, MIDDLE-EASTERN, etc. My response post elaborates on the initial post of using the N Word, because I totally agree that people are in fact racist, without even knowing they are racist, through ignorant statements. While this example may be very miniature or insignificant when compared to the N word, it actually backs up and validates the original author's point; we need to be more politically correct when communicating to others, whether its street-talk or communicating to others in the office.
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The N Word 04 Oct 2015 20:17 #7911

  • SophiaHalavi 24
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This specifically caught my eye because I've recently been studying the history of racism in many of my classes at school, however, I was completely taken aback when I saw this video. I think because the black community has earned their equality in legal terms, most people don't think the issue of race is as relevant now as it once was during the times of slavery. To be honest, before watching this video I didn't really think that the derogatory use of the word still persisted as much internationally. The "n" word is used as a form of common slang this day in age; people use the term to address their friends. I am not agreeing that such use of the word is appropriate but I was completely caught off guard at the fact that people are still negatively associating African Americans with such an offensive and racial slur. I think because I grew up in a time where equality of race, gender, and sexual orientation were all advocated, I can't understand how some people can still behave with such a racist demeanor. I think the differences within each generation also allows for racial prejudice to persist because there will always be those people who carry the mentality of their ancestors and feel justified in discriminating against the black community.
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The N Word 09 Oct 2015 01:00 #7963

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stephen.f wrote:
we need to be more politically correct when communicating to others, whether its street-talk or communicating to others in the office.

I somewhat disagree. I have a friend who's black but he gets furious when anyone calls him African-American in an attempt to be politically correct. Why might you wonder? It’s because he’s French and isn’t American. My friend understands that one is trying to be polite but feels more offended thinking that everyone shares the same mindset that African American is the best politically correct word to use instead of “black” or “the N- word” because it’s such an American-centric mindset. My friend convinced me of how offensive the word “African-American” can be if I used it in his homeland to address black people. He told he understands that his skin color is dark brown and not black but he finds the term “black” to be just fine for its purposes.

My friend’s experience is anecdotal but it really changed by perception on how focusing on being too politically correct can backfire and genuinely offend some people. I also understand that his case isn’t the norm in the US but I also understand how hurtful this misunderstanding can be. This reveals to me that we shouldn’t focus on being politically correct but focus on what people themselves would rather be referred to as. I feel that people focus on themselves too much rather than the people with whom they are interacting with.
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