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TOPIC: I survived an Atomic Bomb

I survived an Atomic Bomb 29 May 2016 23:08 #9993

  • brianne.a
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Seventy years ago this week, the U.S. military dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. About 140,000 people died and more than half of them died within an instant. Three days later, America dropped a second bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, killing about 70,000 people. Within a week later the Japanese government surrendered and formally ended WWII. Victims today that survived this devastation finally shared some of their experiences. They told stories about how as a child they saw a plane in the sky and then a bright, bright light. And within seconds they covered their eyes with their arms and all had very severe burns on their arms, neck, and face. After the bomb fell few were able to walk home, but badly burned. Toshiko Tanaka, atomic bomb survivor, mentioned when she arrived home her house was destroyed but her mother was standing there but couldn’t recognize her. Everyone had charred faces, skin, and clothes. Everyone was unrecognizable. Everyone was walking very slowly like time has slowed down, and people even were dropping dead; the damage of radiation. “To this day, when i see a barbecued tomato, I get goose bumps and shivers all over, because the situation that I saw that day were human bodies that were barbecued just like a tomato. As you know, when you barbecue a tomato, the skin burns off and shrivels up, and that’s the image that comes to my mind when I see a barbecued tomato to this day.” No help came for months. The hospitals were damaged and a lot of the doctors died. The American government and Japanese media told people not to talk about the effect of the atomic bomb for six years. They were told not to talk about what had really happened by the government and were told by really powerful people. People on the outside of Hiroshima were told that the damage wasn't that bad, and that there wasn't that much destruction, and that things were all back to normal.

Can you imagine living this life and then having to hide it? Receiving no help because of the government and the media hiding the truth? Living an ashamed life where no one really knows the truth? Being discriminated from the rest of the people from your country? Fear to get married, have children, risk of cancer and disabilities and paralyzation? I can barely think about it.
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I survived an Atomic Bomb 29 May 2016 23:39 #9997

  • raquel.v
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Hi Brianne
I found your response well interesting because it disccues the history about the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan many years ago. I think it is very sad to hear that in history many years ago many people mostly innocent died and struggled to due war.
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I survived an Atomic Bomb 29 May 2016 23:39 #9998

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struggled and suffered
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