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by Malissa T.

Black Lives Matter

The fight for equality for the black race comes well before the death of George Floyd whose death prompted a worldwide protest for black lives. George Floyd’s death was; for black Americans, the straw that broke the camel’s back. Two months before George Floyd was brutally murdered in plain sight by four Minneapolis police officers, Breonna Taylor a black female was gunned down in her own home by Louisville, Kentucky police officers who are now an ongoing investigation have stated that they had the wrong home. Furthermore, just 13 days before George Floyd’s death, Ahmad Aubrey another black man was murdered by two white citizens who stated it was a “citizens” arrest which sparked outrage amongst all races and nationalities across America which has been a consequent uprising of angry black people who are exhausted and tired of not being heard; deeming the actions of these police officers and white men an act of war against black Americans.

Race & Gender in 2020 America

Being Black in America is hard however being a black woman in America is even harder.  Racism from white people have created a negative stain and smeared on black people entirely. The media as the culprit and a guilty party play a significant role in the spread of hate. Black women are one of the most disrespected women in America. For many reasons, one being that they are never acknowledged in a positive light even in the media, and Black women are not praised for their accomplishments that contribute significantly to the world. As stated in Forbes, Black women across the U.S. voices are important to amplify because the intersection of racism and sexism creates a heavy burden to bear - one that Black women have carried throughout history. In agreement with the black lives matter movement, one black female medical doctor states that “It is a painful reminder of systematic injustice and my inability to protect those I love when their only infraction is the color of their skin.” Further expressing that, throughout her career as a primary care physician, she has indiscriminately cared for those who didn’t particularly look like her with some of whom may have held racist views, as evidenced by their comments or worn paraphernalia and ending her thoughts stating, “I helped save your lives. Please help save ours. Black lives matter.”

Black Lives Matter hashtag became a civil rights movement

According to (Library of Congress) Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a movement that has sparked a response internationally. This movement, originating in the African American community, campaigns, contests, and cries out against violence and systemic oppression and racism toward black people. The continual fight for civil rights started with a #BLM hashtag and was created by a black woman named Alicia Garza. The untimely death of a young black boy named Trayvon Martin sparked an enormous amount of anger in so many people including Alicia Garza. According to the Neighborhood Funders Group (NFG) when Trayvon Martin was murdered by George Zimmerman and was acquitted and the murder was justified, Alicia Garza resides in Oakland, California, took her angered concerns to Facebook to express her disgust for the outcome and injustice for Trayvon Martin. As a longtime social activist, had been working for years to end systemic racism. She had led activist movements in the San Francisco Bay Area. Alicia wanted to publicly shed light on the injustice of police brutality and the violence afflicted on black people.

Perspective

Black people are being killed every day because of the anger and hatred that other races, particularly white people have for the black race. The amount of ignorance that people demonstrate continuously; repeats the cycle of hatred, racism, and illiteracy amongst white people creating a never-ending continuation of racism that affects the livelihood and mental health of black people. George Zimmerman was acquitted and was never charged for blatantly killing a young black boy. What would have happened to George Zimmerman if the young boy he killed was a white boy? History has proven that the justice system has never been in favor of black people and will always side with the white race.  How can a black person ever have complete judicial equality when white supremacy associates are swarming in the police departments, courthouses, supreme courthouses, attorney offices, the Senate, the House of Representatives, Congress, and the White House. Black people don’t even have the same level of access to any of those judicial offices because we are still 200 years behind in education and opportunity.

Black Lives Matter in the Media

There are so many perceptions on social media and in the media about the Black Lives Matter movement with some suggesting that a movement is an act of racism itself and that the riots and looting that is taking place is a direct reason why black people are in oppression in the first place. While most people believe that the actions of this continual fight for civil rights are necessary in order to get the attention of the federal government to change laws and regulations that would protect black people from being provoked by police officers and for equality for black people. And having conversations on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, ABC News, Fox News, and CNN news. Most people also believe that the fight for black lives is essential to creating the same privilege white people have. On the other hand, some white people do not agree with the continual fight for civil rights and the statement of “Black Lives Matter and will say, All Lives Matter, white lives matter, or blue lives matter. What these people don’t understand is that state, “All Lives Matter,” dismissing the BLM movement. How can all lives matter, when black life doesn’t matter? We will never understand the people perceptive on ALM.

 

 

Reference

Bastian, Rebekah. “These Are The Voices Of Black Women In America.” Forbes, Forbes Magazine, 9 June 2020, www.forbes.com/sites/rebekahbastian/2020/06/09/these-are-the-voices-of-black-women-in-america/#3fde14e46a5d.

Pleasant, Liz. “Meet the Woman Behind #BlackLivesMatter - The Hashtag That Became a Civil Rights Movement.” NFG, 7 Dec. 2018, www.nfg.org/news/meet-woman-behind-blacklivesmatter-hashtag-became-civil-rights-movement.

“Black Lives Matter (BLM).” The Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0016241/